‘This Week In Trump’s War on Women’: The first female GOP presidential nominee in modern history, who will it be?

The women’s rights movement, now with more than 200,000 registered chapters, is still growing, with several thousand women running for office, many of them women of color.

The group is poised to win the 2020 presidential election, but the Democratic Party is also expanding its appeal to a larger swath of women voters, and the party has recently begun a broad push to recruit female leaders.

But one candidate who has received attention from the Democratic National Committee and the Trump campaign is former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Pelosi was first elected in 2010 and is now the leader of the House Democratic Caucus, which represents Democrats in the House.

She has made a career out of her work in Congress, including her efforts to help shape the Democratic platform in the last Congress.

The progressive agenda that Pelosi championed includes the Women’s Equality Act, which would ensure equal pay for equal work, as well as other measures aimed at helping women achieve economic security.

On Monday, a day after President Trump tweeted a tweet calling Pelosi a “disgrace to American politics,” the former House speaker made a surprise appearance on Fox News.

“It is a shame that the Democratic party has failed to elect a woman to the office of Speaker of the house,” Pelosi said.

Trump, who has called Pelosi “out of touch,” is the first president to call Pelosi a political foe. “

And so if the Republicans decide to go with a candidate that’s not even a Democrat, that doesn’t make sense.”

Trump, who has called Pelosi “out of touch,” is the first president to call Pelosi a political foe.

But Pelosi, who served as the House speaker from 2005 to 2011, is not the first female Democratic leader to make the Whitehouse’s roster.

In the late 1980s, Democratic Senator Elizabeth Dole was the first woman to serve as the nation’s first female senator from Delaware.

In 1994, Nancy Schaefer became the first Democratic woman to be elected governor of Minnesota.

And in 2003, Nancy Kasper became the youngest person ever elected to Congress.

Both were part of a Democratic majority in the Senate.

“I was proud to serve in that role, and it was a privilege to have a female member of the Senate and a woman in Congress,” Kasper said in a statement.

Pelosi said in the Fox News interview that while the Republican Party is not focused on her, she believes there are more women in politics than there are Republicans. “

We must be prepared to be more inclusive in electing our future leaders, and that starts with electing more women and girls into Congress.”

Pelosi said in the Fox News interview that while the Republican Party is not focused on her, she believes there are more women in politics than there are Republicans.

“There are women in every state, there are women senators, and there are a number of women governors, and women members of Congress,” she said.